A September 13 article on MLIVE discussed the potential demolition of the chimney swift roost at 415 W. Washington Street, across from the Ann Arbor YMCA. Washtenaw Audubon intends to try to save the chimney from demolition to protect the roosting Chimney Swifts at this site. A resolution is being prepared that would require consideration of the chimney swift issue in all development proposals; council members from all wards will vote on whether to pass this resolution, which will be an essential first step in speaking out for the swifts.

Washtenaw Audubon is thrilled to announce that the Ann Arbor City Council has heard your voices, and voted unanimously to evaluate the chimney at 415 W. Washington for retention, even while other structures at the site are demolished. IF the chimney can be salvaged, and IF the funds can be raised to do necessary repairs, our beloved swifts will be safe in their historic roost. There are plenty of hurdles ahead, but having the city's cooperation is huge. A well-timed thank you can do wonders to keep the good will flowing....please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to thank them. The meeting lasted into the early morning hours with more complicated agenda items, and they still stuck it out to vote on the Chimney Swift legislation. 

Here are some relevant links for your perusal:

Again, thank you to our concerned community for responding on behalf of the swifts! Never doubt that you can change the world....you just did!

by Glenn Belyea

LaRue “Tex” Wells of Ann Arbor, dean of Michigan birders and a Washtenaw Audubon member since 1973, passed away on August 16, 2018, just a few days shy of his 97th birthday. Tex, as he was always known in Michigan, was born in Rockport, Texas, but soon moved to Port Arthur, Texas where his father was a tugboat captain. After graduating from high school, he took flying lessons and obtained his pilot’s license. In July of 1942 he enlisted in the Army as an Aviation Cadet. Tex was sent to England as a C-47 (the military version of the Douglas DC-3 passenger plane) pilot where he transported troops and supplies into Europe and returned wounded soldiers to England.